Thursday, April 24, 2014

India

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In addition to the Vaideyswara, there are a small number of other temples that have emerged from the sand, including the Kirthi Naryana pictured above. Unlike all the other temples in Talakad, this is dedicated to Vishnu. It’s also the only one built in Hoysala style. You can read more about the Kirthi Naryana Temple here

Nearby is the much less imposing Patalesvara, which is decidedly small despite being one of the five Panchalinga temples in Talakad. You can read more about this structure here.

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Here's the third and final part of my Hampi eBook video interview.

In this segment I talk about my plans for my latest eBook project covering some of the hidden gems that you can visit near Mysore, such as Talakad.


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The Kirthi Narayana Temple provides an interesting contrast to the other temples in Talakad, not least because it is the only temple in the town dedicated to Vishnu rather than Shiva.

It’s also the only temple that is built in Hoysala style, having been constructed during the reign of the Hoysala king Vishnuvardhana by his guru Ramanujacharya during the twelfth century AD. Indeed, like the five Panchalinga temples in Talakad, it is also part of a quintet of temples. Known as the Pancha Narayana Kshetrams, these are spread over a much wider area than the Talakad Panchalinga, with the others being located in the towns of Melkote, Tondanur, Belur, and Gundlupet.

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Located close by the Vaideyswara Temple, the Patalesvara Temple is also one of the five Panchalinga temples but is a much smaller and less imposing structure that is almost hidden away in an excavated pit.

Although the original shrine dates back to the tenth century, most of the building is of a much more recent vintage. The Linga in the inner sanctum is said to change color during the day, starting out red in the morning, then turning black in the afternoon, and finally becoming white at night.

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One day you will be able to point your smart phone at a carving like this in a remote Indian temple and find out everything you need to know about it as a result of the development of technologies such as augmented reality.

From a technical point of view, capturing all this data and storing it on the cloud is not that difficult because millions of people are already carrying around excellent digital cameras integrated into their smart phones and tablets that make it possible to shoot high quality photos and videos and upload them directly to the cloud over 3G networks.

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In my next eBook I am going to be writing about some of the hidden gems located close to the city of Mysore in Karnataka.

In the case of Talakad this is almost literally the case, for there are estimated to be around thirty ancient temples buried underneath the sand dunes that almost completely covered the town in 1634.

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Here's the second part of the interview I did about my recently published eBooks on Hampi. In addition to talking about how writing an eBook can help you get the most out of the photographs you take on a trip, I also describe the audiences that the books are targeted at.

Here’s part I of a recent interview I did in which I talk about why I decided to write my eBooks on Hampi and the exciting possibilities for eBook publishing, particularly in niche areas.

Next time I do an interview I’ll try and make sure my shirt collar is in the right place…..


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After completing the BrownBeat Guide to Hampi, I felt I had a lot of materials about the place that I hadn’t fully utilized, so I decided as an experiment to put together a complementary volume featuring my favorite photos of the old Vijayanagara capital and surrounding countryside together with some brief descriptions of the major sights.

Called the BrownBeat Photo Companion to Hampi, this eBook is now available from Amazon for 99 cents (though prices may vary depending on your location) and can also be borrowed through the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library.

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The only one of the five Panchalinga temples in Talakad that has been fully excavated from the sand dunes, the Vaideyswara is a highly ornate Dravidian structure constructed almost entirely out of granite and plays a pivotal role in the Panchalinga Darshana festival. 

The original shrine on this site was built in the eleventh century when Talakad was under the control of the Cholas, and was subsequently expanded under the rule of the Hoysala and Vijayanagara empires, as well as the Maharajas of Mysore.

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